Poem: Enough


I leap

from tear to tear

It is not

fear

that pulls me

inside

and shut

It is the

bleeding hope

shot out

by

triggered hate

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Poem: The Speech


Common ground

must abound

for this country

to unite

and to set

founding notions right

Not you

against me

She vs. he

White is better

than Black

or pretend

global warming

is not a fact

Walls must fall

while we help

all who call

No matter tint

of skin

where preference

is no mortal sin

And believing

means freedom

the wisdom of truth

found in our

words

Not blurred

by hatred or fear

but once again

self-evident

we the people

are equal

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poem: Anne


Just like every

teenage girl

hating her mother

adoring her father

(knock knock–run and hide)

confounded by her

changing body

as her clothing shrank

(keep quiet–voices down)

With her big voice

and own ideas

all alone and feeling

unloved

(thump thump–what was that?)

Just a girl

with a yellow star

who said what she felt

(Move that there!)

So the world would

live the truth

(Come with us!)

Forever

Clarity


Seeing people for who they really are, whether they are homeless or our closest friends/family, can often be challenging. As humans, we spend a lot of time trying to create comfort around us, and this may include internal comfort also. Living in a world where situations can bring us discomfort, our brain will do as much as it can to remove the ‘bad’ stuff; erase memories or twist pictures before our eyes into something we’d prefer to see.

Seeing the world around us without our rose-colored glasses can often be painful, on a personal and global level. It may reveal our own child as a drug addict or a fellow human as hungry, neither snapshot as something we want to see.

But both these things are truths before us and must be acknowledged. They are drastic cases of what we see when we choose to have our eyes truly open to people around us. How do these things make us feel about these people and how do we react in response? Afterall, it does not change the fact that they are both humans still…

What if what our eyes remain closed to simpler truths about someone else? Things that just make them who they are, but different from you and I? Have we truly listened and accepted what someone has told us about their feelings or needs? Or are we trying to change them to fit into our agenda?

It can be a challenge to accept someone just as they are; especially when they look or act differently. Each day the world seems to become less and less accepting and we drift farther apart from our shared humanity.

Respect and listening. If we felt heard and respected, no matter how minor the role we may play in this game called life, then we can feel here, human and a part of the whole.

 

 

 

 

 

Ironic??


Is it ironic that I saw this Mockingbird perched upon the American flag  today: July 4th, 2017 given the state of our nation?

Maybe this bird understands something many folks seem to be missing these days….

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

Walk In Peace


So I was thinking about my post yesterday about the horror of the Boston Marathon and about what I wrote as humans having the natural tendency to gather in groups. That from prehistoric times, this is something we did as hunter-gatherers and this instinct has carried on into modern times. It’s part of what makes us human. This behavior, but also speech and the desire to worship and have religions, are some of the main things that make us different from ‘animals’.

I thought about how our ‘right’ to gather in groups or assemble, is being threatened now by other humans. And how we consider this a ‘right’ because it’s actually in our U.S. Constitution as a first amendment right.  The right to assemble, just like freedom of speech and religion. 

And I thought: isn’t that interesting? That our forefathers took the pieces that make us human and created laws to protect those parts! Because speech and religion is specific to us (or at least in the sense that we think of it). Even the right to bear arms! Only we have weapons! Animals may have crude tools, but not weapons. And we must have a special law to protect this ‘right’ also. Now look how having these weapons are coming around full cycle. They protect and harm at the same time. 

Sure there are many, many laws. And some maybe would intersect with the animal kingdom I suppose. (Like animals have territory). But it seems that the most important ones that we put on the top of the list are specific to us. The ones we hold most dear and fight for most passionately! I am human: let me speak, let me assemble, let me pray!  These are my rights. This makes me who I am and it is the law. 

As these things are now being taken by terrorists–every time a bomb goes off during a speech, or in a church, or a marathon, we lose a bit of our humanness. And each time that collective connection that binds us together seems to become more fragile.

Hope is another thing that makes us human. We cling to it desperately. Amidst the tears, the smoke and blood we can continue to hope for a better world. A world where what our forefathers created for us in our U.S. Constitution can be embraced by every citizen without fear. And that a new day will come where we all walk in peace.